Our Scope

Socaba identifies as a Trust Exchange: all our work is carried out with the dedication to achieving high-quality results, commitment to professionalism with partners and stakeholders at all levels, and adherence to deep intellectual honesty in all our findings.

Within this context, Socaba engages across the four main themes of governance, security, justice and migration. Our teams bring each client a combination of in-depth sectoral knowledge and front-line expert innovation. Our mission is to help clients achieve excellence in their field.

Governance

In fragile or conflict-affected states, governance is often inefficient and corruption omnipresent. Poor governance enables the abuse of authority, lack of public transparency, weak justice systems and incoherent policy development and delivery. These limit economic growth, diminish institutional trust, distort competition, promote non-authoritarian regimes and disproportionately impact on poor and marginalized citizens. In these settings, long-term reform agendas fail because short-term (frequently personal) gain is prioritised over the national interest.

Socaba supports capacity-building processes within public institutions promoting, amongst others, security, the rule of law, access to justice, health and education. Socaba works with civil society to enhance the capability, ownership and governance of local, national and international civil society organisations and public institutions.

In Focus: Evaluation of Global Aid Flows to Palestine

Socaba lead the development of strategic framework for accounting for donor funding to Palestine. Engaged key government offices (prime, justice and planning ministries), all bilateral and multilateral donors, and INGOs and NGOs implementing assistance in order to assess global aid flows to Palestine and improve national planning.

Governance

In fragile or conflict-affected states, governance is often inefficient and corruption omnipresent. Poor governance enables the abuse of authority, lack of public transparency, weak justice systems and incoherent policy development and delivery. These limit economic growth, diminish institutional trust, distort competition, promote non-authoritarian regimes and disproportionately impact on poor and marginalized citizens. In these settings, long-term reform agendas fail because short-term (frequently personal) gain is prioritised over the national interest.

Socaba supports capacity-building processes within public institutions promoting, amongst others, security, the rule of law, access to justice, health and education. Socaba works with civil society to enhance the capability, ownership and governance of local, national and international civil society organisations and public institutions.

In Focus: Evaluation of Global Aid Flows to Palestine

Socaba lead the development of strategic framework for accounting for donor funding to Palestine. Engaged key government offices (prime, justice and planning ministries), all bilateral and multilateral donors, and INGOs and NGOs implementing assistance in order to assess global aid flows to Palestine and improve national planning.

In Focus: EU East Jerusalem Programme Evaluation

Socaba lead the evaluation of the EU’s support to the Palestinian population in East Jerusalem in the 2012-18 period (over €60m), focusing especially on support for legal protection. The wider evaluation also included the evaluation of support to education, social welfare, community development, and cultural identity.

Justice

An independent, fair and effective judicial system, allowing access to justice for all, is the cornerstone of a well-functioning society. Manifest political interference and vested interest in the judicial system leads to low levels of transparency, reduced institutional trust and a systemic disregard of individual freedoms and international human rights obligations. A lack of legal accountability allows local corruption to undermine economies, diverting resources from where they are needed the most. Systems provide preferential treatment to the rich and powerful and limit minority and marginalised groups’ access to justice, resulting for example in women facing multiple forms of discrimination, violence and sexual harassment without proper protections, or overcrowded prisons full of the poor and vulnerable waiting years for trial.

A multi-layered approach is required to address the challenges and issues within the justice sector, targeting both state and non-state actors. Unorthodox solutions and partnerships between civil society and public institutions are necessary to respond to the challenges of fragile states. Socaba seeks to contribute to this approach by enhancing the state’s ability (at all levels) to engage in productive partnerships with non-state actors

Justice

An independent, fair and effective judicial system, allowing access to justice for all, is the cornerstone of a well-functioning society. Manifest political interference and vested interest in the judicial system leads to low levels of transparency, reduced institutional trust and a systemic disregard of individual freedoms and international human rights obligations. A lack of legal accountability allows local corruption to undermine economies, diverting resources from where they are needed the most. Systems provide preferential treatment to the rich and powerful and limit minority and marginalised groups’ access to justice, resulting for example in women facing multiple forms of discrimination, violence and sexual harassment without proper protections, or overcrowded prisons full of the poor and vulnerable waiting years for trial.

A multi-layered approach is required to address the challenges and issues within the justice sector, targeting both state and non-state actors. Unorthodox solutions and partnerships between civil society and public institutions are necessary to respond to the challenges of fragile states. Socaba seeks to contribute to this approach by enhancing the state’s ability (at all levels) to engage in productive partnerships with non-state actors

In Focus: EU East Jerusalem Programme Evaluation

Socaba lead the evaluation of the EU’s support to the Palestinian population in East Jerusalem in the 2012-18 period (over €60m), focusing especially on support for legal protection. The wider evaluation also included the evaluation of support to education, social welfare, community development, and cultural identity.

Migration

There are currently around 65 million displaced persons, more than 21 million of whom are refugees. International and domestic disagreements on irregular and uncontrolled migration and population displacement have further distorted the debate and clouded policy direction. The intensification of forced migration internally and internationally has serious implications for global poverty, development, demographic and gender dynamics, integration and social cohesion, domestic and international security and foreign relations. Migration issues are complex and overlapping and present governments and the international community with a multifaceted challenge requiring collective action.

Socaba recognises the multifaceted challenges facing countries of both origin and destination, as well as the hardships suffered by the individual migrants. In cooperation with the international community, Socaba contributes to comprehensive, coordinated and sustainable approaches at the political level to reduce the potential of armed conflict as a cause of migration.

In Focus: Evaluation of the United Kingdom’s Migration Fund

Socaba lead the cost-benefit analysis of the UK Returns and Reintegration Fund, involving four country visits and in-depth studies of eight partner countries, for a total of 181 projects (€70m annual budget). The evaluation included the assessment of fund management structures, logistics, communications and relations between HQ and the field missions. The resulting value-for-money calculations provided basis for dialogues that facilitated common understanding among four ministers (FCO, DFID, Home, Justice).

Migration

There are currently around 65 million displaced persons, more than 21 million of whom are refugees. International and domestic disagreements on irregular and uncontrolled migration and population displacement have further distorted the debate and clouded policy direction. The intensification of forced migration internally and internationally has serious implications for global poverty, development, demographic and gender dynamics, integration and social cohesion, domestic and international security and foreign relations. Migration issues are complex and overlapping and present governments and the international community with a multifaceted challenge requiring collective action.

Socaba recognises the multifaceted challenges facing countries of both origin and destination, as well as the hardships suffered by the individual migrants. In cooperation with the international community, Socaba contributes to comprehensive, coordinated and sustainable approaches at the political level to reduce the potential of armed conflict as a cause of migration.

In Focus: Evaluation of the United Kingdom’s Migration Fund

Socaba lead the cost-benefit analysis of the UK Returns and Reintegration Fund, involving four country visits and in-depth studies of eight partner countries, for a total of 181 projects (€70m annual budget). The evaluation included the assessment of fund management structures, logistics, communications and relations between HQ and the field missions. The resulting value-for-money calculations provided basis for dialogues that facilitated common understanding among four ministers (FCO, DFID, Home, Justice).

In Focus: Evaluation of the Africa for Peace Programme (2004-2017)

Evaluated the Danish contributions to building African capacity for preventing conflict, including trust funds (joint financing agreements).

Security

Around 2 billion people live in countries affected by fragility, conflict and high levels of violence, and around half of the world’s poor live in fragile or conflict-affected states. States are confronted by issues of crime, public disorder, gender-based violence, increasing polarisation, terrorism, natural disasters and internal crises. All of which limit economic growth and prosperity and can spill over to destabilise the immediate neighbourhood and beyond.

In many parts of the globe, the police, military and other security actors lack the capacity and expertise to react effectively to these threats in line with international standards, including on human rights. Crises are mostly treated superficially: situations are often stabilised with short-term interventions, which neglects the necessary long-term investment in locally grounded institutions and resilient societies.

Socaba has extensive security sector capacity building experience, targeted at reducing violent conflict and helping to build peace. Sustainable peace is achieved through the use of cohesive national and international resources, including political, diplomatic, security, and development aid instruments. Socaba draws on each of these resources to contribute its expertise to supporting peace and security globally.

Security

Around 2 billion people live in countries affected by fragility, conflict and high levels of violence, and around half of the world’s poor live in fragile or conflict-affected states. States are confronted by issues of crime, public disorder, gender-based violence, increasing polarisation, terrorism, natural disasters and internal crises. All of which limit economic growth and prosperity and can spill over to destabilise the immediate neighbourhood and beyond.

In many parts of the globe, the police, military and other security actors lack the capacity and expertise to react effectively to these threats in line with international standards, including on human rights. Crises are mostly treated superficially: situations are often stabilised with short-term interventions, which neglects the necessary long-term investment in locally grounded institutions and resilient societies.

Socaba has extensive security sector capacity building experience, targeted at reducing violent conflict and helping to build peace. Sustainable peace is achieved through the use of cohesive national and international resources, including political, diplomatic, security, and development aid instruments. Socaba draws on each of these resources to contribute its expertise to supporting peace and security globally.

In Focus: Evaluation of the Africa for Peace Programme (2004-2017)

Evaluated the Danish contributions to building African capacity for preventing conflict, including trust funds (joint financing agreements).

Social Capital Bank